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The Geeky Gourmet moves to Paris

The Geeky Gourmet moves to Paris

The Geeky Gourmet moves to Paris

Mon, 06 Aug 2007 18:13:01 +0000

The Geeky Gourmet moves to Paris

It’s been quite a few months since posts appeared here on The Geeky Gourmet with anything approaching regularity. Since blog freshness is often measured in hours or days, not quarters, that means this site has been as good as dead—or at least, let’s say, in a state of suspended animation. I feel badly about that. It was never my intention to let the site go, but the simple fact is that I got busy with many other things, and GG was near the bottom of my priority list.

The biggest of the many things I was busy with all those months was moving…to Paris! (You can read about the move and my life here in .) Now that I’m here and settled, and not nearly as overwhelmed with projects as I was for so long, I feel that the time has come to resurrect The Geeky Gourmet. New posts will appear, starting tomorrow, on a respectably frequent basis. (I can’t promise they’ll be daily, but certainly I hope to post multiple times per week.)

Paris, of course, has a lot going on in the world of food. I’ll be mentioning some of that in future posts. I’m not the sort of person who dines out at fancy restaurants every week, though, so look for the same sorts of down-to-earth topics that have appeared here in the past.

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Three-Tiered Oven Rack

Three-Tiered Oven Rack

Three-Tiered Oven Rack

Fri, 17 Nov 2006 14:00:23 +0000

Three-Tiered Oven Rack

When cooking for a crowd—especially if the meal involves lots of different baked dishes, as it typically does at Thanksgiving—those of use with just one oven often run into a problem. There’s just not enough space in there for a turkey, an extra casserole of stuffing, some candied sweet potatoes, and perhaps that pie you should have baked yesterday. And yet, we sure do want everything to be done at the same time! I liked this solution from Williams-Sonoma very much: a . It’s designed to take up just half the width of an average oven but add three racks, each of which comfortably fits a large casserole or baking dish. Just $22, but because it’s available only through their catalog and over the Internet, order today if you want it to arrive by Thanksgiving!

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37 Foods by Subscription

37 Foods by Subscription

37 Foods by Subscription

Mon, 30 Oct 2006 19:45:35 +0000

37 Foods by Subscription

Over on

today, I posted a list of

you can get in the mail every month with a subscription. More than half of these are foods. I’ve personally been a member of a fruit-of-the-month club and a chocolate-of-the-month club, and for a while we subscribed to the Illy a Casa program to get coffee delivered every month. My overall impression of these programs is that the quality and convenience tend to be quite good, though that the prices seem out of proportion, at least if you have decent local markets. Even so, who wouldn’t like getting cookies or wine in the mail every month?

Avocados:

Bacon:

Barbecue Sauce: ,

(Amazing Clubs),

(The Month Club Store),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Beef Jerky:

(The Month Club Store)

Beer:

(Clubs of America), , ,

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Cake:

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Candy:

Cheese:

(iGourmet),

Cheesecake:

(Amazing Clubs)

Chicken Soup:

Chocolate:

(Clubs of America),

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Coffee:

(Clubs of America),

(iGourmet),

(Illy),

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Cookies:

(Amazing Clubs),

(The Month Club Store),j // (Delightful Deliveries)

Desserts:

(Amazing Clubs)

Fruit:

(Clubs of America),

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Gourmet Foods:

Gourmet Meals:

(Amazing Clubs)

Hot Sauce:

(Amazing Clubs),

(The Month Club Store)

Ice Cream: ,

(Amazing Clubs)

Jelly Beans:

Jelly:

(The Month Club Store)

Lobster:

(Amazing Clubs)

Mustard:

(Mustard Museum),

(The Month Club Store)

Nuts:

(The Month Club Store)

Olive Oil:

(The Month Club Store)

Olives:

(The Month Club Store)

Organic Fruit:

(Delightful Deliveries)

Pasta:

(Amazing Clubs),

(The Month Club Store),

(Delightful Deliveries)

Pickles:

(The Month Club Store)

Pizza:

(Clubs of America)

Popcorn:

(The Month Club Store)

Potato Chips:

(The Month Club Store)

Salsa:

(iGourmet),

(The Month Club Store)

Soup:

(The Month Club Store)

Steak:

(Amazing Clubs),

(Omaha Steaks)

Tea:

(iGourmet),

(Adagio Teas),

(The Month Club Store), /// (Delightful Deliveries)

Wine:

(Clubs of America), ,

(Amazing Clubs),

(Delightful Deliveries)

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Celebrating the staff of life

Celebrating the staff of life

Celebrating the staff of life

Mon, 16 Oct 2006 04:22:57 +0000

Celebrating the staff of life

Bake it or buy it, but blog about it. Monday Oct. 16 has been declared

by the International Union of Bakers and Bakers-Confectioners. The idea here is to appreciate this “universal product, found in every civilisation.”

Over at the

blog they’re urging people to photograph and blog about their favorite bread and to send in the links for an Oct. 17 blog round-up.

This got me thinking about not just the universality of bread but the distinctive local variations. I’ve noticed that most major American cities have their own traditional breakfast bread. Boston, for instance, has the grilled corn muffin or blueberry muffin; New York, the bagel; most Southern cities, the sausage biscuit. In eastern Ohio and southwestern New York, you might be lucky enough to find a town that still offers salt-rising toast as a breakfast option. San Francisco, of course, has sourdough toast. When I arrived in Seattle some years back, giant cinnamon rolls studded with raisins and slathered with icing were in vogue. (Can anyone tell me about the breakfast breads for Minneapolis? Kansas City? Detroit?)

If I could celebrate World Bread Day by eating any bread in the world, it would be the made in Recco, a Ligurian coastal town a bit to the east of Genoa. A soft cheese with a taste very much like sour cream is baked on the oil-brushed focaccia, and the result is utterly addictive. Sadly, there’s no focaccia formaggio in Seattle (the authentic cheese being unobtainable outside of Italy), so I’ll probably mark the day with a fresh cardamom braid from our local Scandinavian bakery.

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Introducing The Geeky Gourmet

Introducing The Geeky Gourmet

Fri, 08 Sep 2006 14:00:46 +0000

Introducing The Geeky Gourmet

I’ve always had a bit of a hard time figuring out what my occupation is, even when I had a conventional full-time job. For the past 15 years or so, I’ve worked with technology in various capacities—computer graphic artist, tech support drone, product manager, project manager, consultant, writer, and editor. The common thread seems to be that I enjoy, and am apparently pretty good at, explaining things. I can explain how to upgrade your computer’s operating system, or get your mouse driver or word processor to behave, or get rid of all that annoying spam, in simple language that even the least technically savvy person will understand.

In one sense, I’m a computer geek (and proud of it), but computers are just one small part of my life. I’m fascinated by all sorts of interesting things, most of which have nothing to do with technology. That’s why I started Web sites like

and , where I can write about a wider range of topics than what I normally get paid to cover. A lot of the posts on those sites involve food in one way or another, reflecting one of my great passions in life. I never wanted to be a professional chef, but I love eating and preparing good food. I have especially great respect for people who go beyond mere recipes, digging into the science behind the ingredients and cooking techniques—the chemistry, physics, and physiology of food. My heroes in the food world are people like Alton Brown, Harold McGee, and Shirley O. Corriher, and

is one of my favorite magazines (right up there with ).

Little did I imagine a year ago that I’d be starting my own food blog. After all, what can I say about food and cooking that people far more qualified than I couldn’t? Then, with the encouragement of my publisher, I began writing , an experiment in which we’re taking our computer ebook model and applying it to the world of cooking. In that process, I discovered that I did have quite a few things to say that I wasn’t seeing anywhere else (that being the reason for the new book in the first place).

This blog will contain only the occasional recipe—I’m not as interested in recipes as I am in cooking technology. By “technology” I don’t necessarily mean gadgets, though I’ll certainly cover plenty of food-related gadgets here. Rather, I mean the techniques and science of making food—and making it taste good. Along the way, I’ll use this as a forum to talk about any other food-related topics that strike my fancy, which could mean restaurant reviews, commentary about the latest diet trends (and my own eating habits), book reviews, culinary news, and so on. Naturally, one topic that has become especially dear to me is that of preparing Thanksgiving dinner, so a number of posts will involve that meal in one way or another.

As time goes on, I plan to invite several of my colleagues from the computer world who also like to cook to join me as contributors to The Geeky Gourmet. So you’re bound to see a wide variety of opinions (perhaps even contradictory ones) here. I hope you’ll enjoy what you read.

Bon appétit!

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